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Tree Surgery

Crown FM offers formative pruning services, delivered by our NPTC certified Tree Surgeons. We can access tree canopies using LOLER checked ropes and harnesses or mobile elevating work platforms. Our professional and experienced teams offer a range of services including

1. Crown Thinning

Crown thinning is the removal of a portion of smaller/tertiary branches, usually at the outer crown, to produce a uniform density of foliage around an evenly spaced branch structure. It is usually confined to broad-leaved species. Crown thinning does not alter the overall size or shape of the tree. Material should be removed systematically throughout the tree, should not exceed the stated percentage and not more than 30% overall. Common reasons for crown thinning are to allow more light to pass through the tree, reduce wind resistance, reduce weight (but this does not necessarily reduce leverage on the structure) and is rarely a once only operation particularly on species that are known to produce large amounts of epicormic growth.

2. Crown Lifting (or Crown Raising)

Crown lifting is the removal of the lowest branches and/or preparing of lower branches for future removal. Good practice dictates crown lifting should not normally include the removal of large branches growing directly from the trunk as this can cause large wounds which can become extensively decayed leading to further long term problems or more short term biomechanical instability. Crown lifting on older, mature trees should be avoided or restricted to secondary branches or shortening of primary branches rather than the whole removal wherever possible. Crown lifting is an effective method of increasing light transmission to areas closer to the tree or to enable access under the crown but should be restricted to less than 15% of the live crown height and leave the crown at least two thirds of the total height of the tree. Crown lifting should be specified with reference to a fixed point, e.g. ‘crown lift to give 5.5m clearance above ground level’.

 3. Crown Reduction

The reduction in height and/or spread of the crown (the foliage bearing portions) of a trees. Crown reduction may be used to activate mechanical stress on individual branches or the whole tree, make the tree more suited to its immediate environment or to reduce the effects of shading and light loss, etc. The final result should retain the main framework of the crown, and so a significant proportion of the leaf bearing structure, and leave a similar, although smaller outline, and not necessarily achieve symmetry for its own sake. Crown reduction cuts should be as small as possible and in general not exceed 100mm diameter unless there is an over-riding need to do so. Reductions should be specified by actual measurements, where possible, and reflect the finished result, but may also refer to lengths of parts to be removed to aid clarity, e.g. ‘crown reduce in height by 2.0m and lateral spread by 1.0m, all round, to finished crown dimensions of 18m in height by 11m in spread (all measurements approximate.)’. Not all species are suitable for this treatment and crown reduction should not be confused with ‘topping’, an indiscriminate and harmful treatment.

4. Deadwooding

As a tree matures it is completely natural for it to produce dead and dying wood. The general process of “dead wooding” is to remove dead, dying and diseased branches through out the crown.

The simply purpose of this is to make what’s known as the impact area (directly beneath the trees canopy) a safer environment to be in, so there is no chance of any limb shedding or falling from the trees canopy.

5. Sectional felling

Sectional felling/dismantling, using heavy duty ropes, pulleys and specialist equipment. We climb the tree and take it down piece by piece. We use this method when there is limited space on the ground e.g. close proximity to persons or property.

6.Straight Fell

Calculated & controlled felling, cutting the bottom of the tree at ground level, the tree falls as it stands into a safe pre determined landing area.  

We also carry out aerial tree inspections, allowing us to safely maintain those trees that have limited accessibility. We ensure full health and safety and environmental assessments are completed before starting work.

Our proactive tree management plans help landowners to fulfil their “Duty of Care”. By using our managed programme of works, we can save you from having to pay over the odds for reactive callouts. A healthy looking tree can still be diseased from the inside and its collapse could cause property damage, life changing injuries or even death. Let Ground Control help you look after your living assets, so they are a joy for future generations.

 

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